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Batter / Pancake / Toad in the Hole

For pancake batter add one tbsp oil to the mix.

Omit the mustard for sweet pancakes or recipes.

Add the egg to the dry ingredients and make a paste. Gradually loosen this by adding milk and stirring.

Chill the batter mix before use. The oiled cooking pan needs to be smoking hot when you pour the batter in.

Plain flour 50 g 100 g
Mustard powder 1/2 tsp 1 tsp
Salt to taste to taste
Medium egg 1 1 or 2
Whole milk 100 to 150 ml 200 to 300 ml

 


Sponge for a mug or small jug

Scale this up as necessary.

Blend the sugar into the almost melted butter. Blend in the egg. Add the flour and mix well but stop once it's mixed.

Bake or, for something more like a souffle, microwave but be careful not to overcook. Test after one minute by stabbing with a skewer. If it comes out dry, it's cooked.

Butter 60 g
Caster sugar 60 g
Self raising flour 60 g
Medium egg 1

 


Santiago Tart

Cream the sugar and eggs, add the ground almonds, fill the greased and floured case and bake.

Individual Shared Big
Ground Almonds 100 g 200 g 400 g
Sugar 100 g 200 g 400 g
Eggs 2 4 8
Lemon Zest 1 Lemon + 1tbsp juice 2 Lemons + 2 4 Lemons + 4
Orange Zest (optional) 1 Orange 2 Oranges 4 Oranges
Cinnamon,
Orange flower water,
Brandy, Almond extract
(optional)
Experiment Experiment Experiment

 


Red hot chilli pickle

This makes nearly 7 kg of pickle so you'll need a lot of jars. It's OK to scale the recipe down.

When chopping, take care to avoid large areas of peel which cook into unsightly strands.

Chop or liquidise the tomatoes and chillies using some of the vinegar to loosen the mix.

Chop or liquidise the peeled onions with more of the vinegar.

Chop the apples.

If there are large pieces of ginger, chop them smaller.

Boil all the ingredients. There is a high risk of the mix burning onto the pan. Stir frequently and don't leave unattended.

It's ready once the volume has reduced and very little liquid separates when the mix is off the heat. The apple should have dissolved completely into the mix and the colour will be dark. If the pickling process is incomplete, the fruit might ferment. This could give you exploding pickle jars.

Vinegar without spices 1600 g
Tomatoes 1200 g
Cooking apples 1200 g
Sultanas 1000g
Dry crystallised ginger 700 g
Onions 600g
Sugar 600 g
Salt 3 tsp
Chillies Up to three Scotch bonnets OR a lot more milder ones

Substitute some of the the apples for other fruits seasonally, such as cranberry at Christmas, apricot, in season or whatever is in surplus.


Alcoholic chocolate freezer cake

Crush the biscuits, almost to powder. Add the booze to the biscuits. For very soggy alcohol laden Christmas biscuits, use the full amount.

Slowly melt the butter. Add the treacle and drinking chocolate powder to the melted butter.

Add the crushed biscuits to the melted butter mixture and stir well. Flatten this mixture into a dish / dishes with a large area. Compress the mixture well. It should be a bit thicker than a biscuit.

Melt the dark eating chocolate and spread it over the biscuit mix. After spreading the melted chocolate, roughen the surface by stabbing it all over with a fork. This helps the chocolate layer to stick.

Allow it to cool and set. Before it becomes brittle, cut it up into slices. Freeze it.

Big Small
Digestive biscuits (McVitie's work best) 1000 g 400 g
Butter 400 g 160 g
70% dark chocolate 400 g 160 g
Drinking chocolate powder 160 g 64 g
Distilled booze (optional). Rum, brandy or try others. 100 to 400 ml 40 to 160 ml
Black treacle 60 g 24 g

 


Dumplings / Pie Crust

Pie crust might benefit from an egg wash or grated cheese on top.

Self Raising Flour 125 g 100 g
Fat, Suet or Finely grated cheese 60, 60 or 90 g 50, 50 or 70 g
Salt, Pepper, Mustard powder, Herbs, Spices To taste
Water Make a wet dough. Don't kneed it.

 


Bread of the Beast - Stand Mixer Recipe

The evening before ...

Thoroughly mix the following but don't kneed much at all. Cover and leave the mix overnight. The next day there might be some fermentation bubbles. This is OK and might give a slight sourdough flavour. If you have some sourdough starter, try adding some. If you happen to be passing the mix, give it another stir. If you're in a hurry, proceed to step 2, skipping the overnight soak. The bread might rise a bit less.

Water 640 g
Seeded Flour (e.g. Hovis Granary) + Strong White Flour 500 g + 166 g = 666 g
Salt 1 tsp
Dried Skim Milk Powder 4 tbsp
Sugar / Treacle / Molasses 3 tsp

Judgement day ...

Strong White Flour 333 g
Yeast, Fast Action Dried 1 sachet
Oil (extra virgin olive or substitute other oils, melted cool fats, suet, lard, fried onion, fried bacon, fried garlic or herbs for various flavours). 6 tbsp
Seeds or nuts (optional), sunflower, sesame, poppy, oats, barley, chopped pumpkin, etc.  

Throw in the rest of the flour and the dried yeast. Kneed for at least five minutes adding the oil last, bit by bit. This helps to unstick the dough from the bowl.

Leave the dough to rise but not too long. If you are in a hurry you can skip this first rise. The bread will be good but will have a slightly less bready and more cake-like texture. As soon as the dough is rising strongly, knock it down with a few seconds of kneeding. Leaving the dough too long at the first rise, causes lifeless dense loaves or even bricks.

So far the entire process has taken place in the mixer bowl. Now divide the batch it into two large bread tins or more smaller ones. At this stage the dough can be covered with flour, oats or seeds or left as it is.

Let the dough rise again in the baking tins. Leaving the dough too long at this stage gives larger uneven bubbles and possible loaf collapse in the oven.

Cook for 30 minutes on gas mark 7 or 220 C fan. A skewer stabbed into the loaf centre should come out dry. Overcooked loaves are too dry. Undercooked loaves will be too soft or even soggy and raw. If you use several smaller baking tins, the cooking time will be shorter. You can make rolls. The cooking time is 10 to 12 minutes.

All ingredients should be at an ambient temperature around 22C. If it's cooler things take longer but work well. If it's a lot cooler, pre-warm the ingrediants. If it's hotter everytthing is faster and there is more risk of a loaf collapse. If it's a lot hotter, try to keep the mix cool.

I use a Kenwood Chef Major which copes with this amount of dough with spare capacity. Beware of similar machines, often more expensive, which are not rated for this batch size (1.7kg).

I line the baking tins with silicone cotton and the bread never sticks. Afterwards, the tins and fabric need to be dusted clean but not washed.